Summer 2021

A Beginner's Guide: Rods, Reels, and Combos

Rods

Spinning rods: Spinning rods should always be accompanied with a spinning reel. The reel faces down, and they have larger guides than casting rods, helps to manage your line on casts. Spinning rods are versatile and often used in many different scenarios. 

Casting rods: Casting rods are typically used by avid anglers and are much more powerful than spinning rods. The reel’s seat faces up and should be fished with a low-profile bait cast reel. They are typically used with a heavier weight when fishing in swampier areas. 

Reels

Spinning reels: Spinning reels are the most common reel on the market and are versatile enough to be used by anglers of all skill levels. The spool is exposed on the outside of the reel, which allows for easier access when spooling new line or dealing with line twist. 

Spin cast reels: Spin cast reels are a great option for a beginner or intermediate anglers because of their ease of use. The covered spool protects against line tangle, and casting tends to be easier. However, they will not cast as far as a spinning reel. 

Baitcasting reels: Baitcasting reels are popular with advanced anglers for their casting accuracy and distance, powerful tackling handling abilities, and powerful retrieval. Anglers can control the speed at which the spool turns and the distance the fishing line travels. 

Combos

Spinning combos: Spinning combos have an open face and larger guides. The larger guides help you cast further and help manage your line. They are the perfect choice when using lighter lures such as small crankbaits, tubes, and grubs. Spinning combinations are easy to use and are a popular choice by anglers of all skill levels. 

Spin casting combos: Spincasting combinations have a closed faced reel and are most used by beginner anglers. They come pre-spooled with line and are easy to use. 





Baitcasting combos: Baitcasting combinations have a low profile that sits on top of the rod for an ergonomic feel. They are designed to use heavier lines and are a great choice when using larger lures like spinner baits, flipping jigs, and deep diving crankbaits. 


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